Ajiacos y Mondongos, a Medellín Institution

Ajiacos y Mondongos is a Medellín institution and one of my favorite restaurants here in Medellín

Photo by Amanda Draper.

Photo by Amanda Draper.

 

Ajiacos y Mondongos has been open on Calle 8 #42-46, here in Poblado since 1991. It is one block up from Avenida Poblado, Carrera 43A, a few blocks from Parque Poblado, Parque de la Presidenta and Parque Lleras. It is a hole in the wall place you must try to have lunch at when you are here in Medellín, they serve traditional Colombian food, if you love soup and/or beans this is the place for you. It is open seven days a week, BUT it is only open for lunch, but they are open seven days a week. They are open from from 12:00 PM to 3:30 PM Monday-Friday and from 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM on Saturdays and Sundays. Latin American dignitaries, fashion designers, celebrities, artists including Maestro Fernando Botero, Juanes, Fonseca, J. Balvin, Oscar De La Renta, Carolina Herrera, and more have all declared their love for Ajiacos and Mondongos and have left their mark here.

I LOVE Ajiacos y Mondongos, eating their Ajiaco is the best, no matter how I am feeling, sad, sick, stressed, whatever, eating there makes me happy. I have taken two people visiting Medellín here, my Dad and another person, at different times and they both really enjoyed it. It’s small and not the most interesting restaurant in terms of decoration, but every time that I am there, I feel like I am at home. And the food is cooked with love and done well. There are three main dishes here, Cazeula Paisa, Ajiaco, and Mondongo. They also offer arepas with hogao and some desserts but the soups are the main dishes here, and the beans are amazing. You can see their menu in Spanish here.

 
Image of the inside of Ajiacos y Mondongos courtesy of VIP Columna.

Image of the inside of Ajiacos y Mondongos courtesy of VIP Columna.

 

Cazuela de Frijoles (Cazuela with Beans)

Their recipe is different than other Cazuela recipes typical here in Antioquia. A cazuela for us is similar to a French Cassoulet, but the paisa version is made with red beans instead of white beans. They cook the beans with carrots, and the dish itself comes with chicharrón, avocado, mature plantains, corn, shredded meat and little potato sticks that resemble potato chips. You can take the potato things off if you want. They also offer a vegetarian version of this dish. People love their beans, I mean the number of famous people who have written on the walls about these beans, is quite impressive. I love their cazuela de frijoles and their beans, they might be some of the best beans I have ever had in Colombia, which is saying a lot.

 
Cazuela de Frijoles at ajiacos y Mondongos.

Cazuela de Frijoles at ajiacos y Mondongos.

 

Mondongo

This typical Antioquean soup comes with pork, chorizo, potatoes, carrot, yuca, pepper, and cilantro. Mondongo is usually made with tripe (Cow’s stomach/intestines). I have never actually eaten Mondongo, to my students, if you are reading this, please forgive me for not being as antioqueña as possible. People here seem to like it, and it looks good, so maybe next time that I go, I will try their Mondongo. It is a big portion, so it is recommended to get the half/smaller size since it will fill you up.

 
Mondongo from Ajiacos y Mondongos. image courtesy of revista soho/ajiacos y Mondongos

Mondongo from Ajiacos y Mondongos. image courtesy of revista soho/ajiacos y Mondongos

 

Ajiaco

Ajiaco is actually a chicken soup from Bogotá, but it’s amazing. I eat when I am sick and eating a huge bowl of Ajiaco always helps me feel better. In May 2018, when I was sick along with almost everyone else I knew, with lots of rain every day in Medellín and cold for Medellín, this soup really helped me get better. It is made with chicken broth, chicken breast, criolla potatoes, patusa potatoes, Mazorca (corn on the cob), and guasca, an herb used for Ajiaco. It is served with an arepita-small little white arepa, a portion of avocado, a small bowl of cream you can add and capers. I always eat this ajiaco with the cream, avocado, and ají of course, since ajiaco without ají to me. I always eat this with ají de Habanero; because I have a deep passion and love for ají de habanero, it's the bottle of ají I carry around in my purse here in Medellín.

Seriously, I cannot imagine eating Ajiaco without Ají de Habanero…. This may be a sign y’all that my ají, hot sauce addiction is too far advanced, given the number of ají bottles that are currently in my bedroom here in Medellín within my ají stash. I mostly have ají de habanero, with a couple of bottles of Sriracha and maybe one ají de jalapeño. But this habanero I have with this ajiaco, it really warms up the soup and adds a really great flavor to the Ajiaco, perfectly complimenting the chicken and avocado flavors.

 
Ajiaco from Ajiaco y Mondongos, image courtesy of Revista SOHO/Ajiacos y Mondongos.

Ajiaco from Ajiaco y Mondongos, image courtesy of Revista SOHO/Ajiacos y Mondongos.

 

Ajiacos y Mondongos

Calle 8 #42-46, El Poblado

Hours

Monday-Friday: 12:00 PM-3:30 PM

Saturday and Sunday: 12:00 PM-4:00 PM

+57 (034) 312-2520/+57 (034) 266-5505

Ajiacos and Mondongos delivers within Poblado and is available to order on Rappi and takes reservations for large groups, if it is a weekend afternoon, it may be worth calling ahead for a reservation. You can literally buy buckets of soup from them, which to me is simply #GOALS. They also offer deliver in Poblado and you can order from them on Rappi. While I love this place, it is worth mentioning that it is slightly pricier than other restaurants in the area, but the food is great and really fresh.

 

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AMANDA DRAPER IS THE FOUNDER and author OF "MI VIDA EN MEDELLÍN". SHE IS A WRITER, CONTENT CREATOR, AND TEACHER. A WASHINGTON DC NATIVE, SHE CALLS WASHINGTON D.C. AND MEDELLÍN HOME. SHE HAS A SERIOUS AJÍ ADDICTION, SO YOU WILL PROBABLY FIND HER WITH A BOTTLE OF AJÍ IN HER BAG. IN HER FREE TIME, SHE ENJOYS EXPLORING MEDELLÍN, EATING, READING, WRITING, AND HAVING ADVENTURES.

AMANDA DRAPER IS THE FOUNDER and author OF "MI VIDA EN MEDELLÍN". SHE IS A WRITER, CONTENT CREATOR, AND TEACHER. A WASHINGTON DC NATIVE, SHE CALLS WASHINGTON D.C. AND MEDELLÍN HOME. SHE HAS A SERIOUS AJÍ ADDICTION, SO YOU WILL PROBABLY FIND HER WITH A BOTTLE OF AJÍ IN HER BAG. IN HER FREE TIME, SHE ENJOYS EXPLORING MEDELLÍN, EATING, READING, WRITING, AND HAVING ADVENTURES.